Yemen stamps

Flag of Yemen

Yemen (P.D.R.) stamps

Yemen Kingdom

Yemen (Y.A.R.) stamps

Republic of Yemen stamps

P=have O=dont have it

Yemen Peoples Democratic Rerpublic (PDRY) - A former republic in south Arabia, formed from the former British colony of Aden and protectorate of South Arabia, Established in 1967, when the Federation of South Arabia became independent from Great Britain. Originally named the People's Republic of Southern Yemen, it was renamed the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen in 1970.

South Yemen maintained close ties with the Soviet Union and supported Marxist guerrillas in northern Yemen and in Oman.

 

Yemen Arab Republic (YAR) - formerly a kingdom (Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen), from 1967 also known as North Yemen. When Turkeys Ottoman Empire was dissolved in 1918, the Imam Yahya, leader of the Zaidi community, was left in control.

 

Intermittent fighting, beginning in early 1971, flared into open warfare between the two Yemens in October 1972, with the Yemen Arab Republic (YAR) receiving aid from Saudi Arabia and the Peoples Democratic Republic of Yemen (PDRY) being supplied with Soviet arms.

A cease-fire was arranged in the same month, under the auspices of the Arab League, and soon afterwards both sides agreed to the union of the two Yemens within 18 months. The union was not, however, implemented.

 

In 1990 the two states of Yemen - Yemen Arab Republic (YAR) and the Peoples Democratic Republic of Yemen (PDRY) united to form the Republic of Yemen.

File:LocationYemen.PNG


Yemen (P.D.R.) stamps

Flag

The People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Democratic Yemen, South Yemen or Yemen (Aden) was a socialist republic in present-day southern and eastern Provinces of Yemen.

British interests in the area which would later become the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen (PDRY) began to grow when on January 19, 1839, British East India Company forces captured the port of Aden, to provide a coaling station for ships en route to India.

File:LocationSouthYemen.png

Aden was ruled as part of British India until 1937, when the city of Aden became the Colony of Aden. The Aden hinterland and Hadhramaut to the east formed the remainder of what would become South Yemen and was not administered directly by Aden but were tied to Britain by treaties of protection with local rulers of traditional polities that, together, became known as the Aden Protectorate. Economic development was largely centred in Aden, and while the city flourished, the states of the Aden Protectorate stagnated.

In 1963, Aden and much of the Protectorate were joined to form the Federation of South Arabia with the remaining states that declined to join, mainly in Hadhramaut, forming the Protectorate of South Arabia. Both of these polities were still tied to Britain with promises of total independence in 1968.

Two nationalist groups, the Front for the Liberation of Occupied South Yemen (FLOSY) and the National Front, الجبهة القوميّة (NF), began an armed struggle on 14 October 1963 against British control and, with the temporary closure of the Suez Canal in 1967, the British began to withdraw. Southern Yemen became independent as the People's Republic of South Yemen on 30 November 1967, and the NF consolidated its control in the country.

In June 1969, a radical Marxist wing of NF gained power and changed the country's name on 1 December 1970, to the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. In the PDRY, all political parties were amalgamated into the Yemeni Socialist Party (YSP), which became the only legal party. The PDRY established close ties with the Soviet Union, the People's Republic of China, Cuba, and radical Palestinians.

The major communist powers assisted in the building of the PDRY's armed forces. Strong support from Moscow resulted in Soviet naval forces gaining access to naval facilities in South Yemen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People%27s_Democratic_Republic_of_Yemen


Scott: #149-52O

Issued: 9.10.1974

Centenary, UPU

Inside #149: Yemen PDR #75O


Scott: #225-7O

Issued: 27.8.1979

Death Centenary of Sir Rowland Hill

Inside #226: Yemen PDR #56O

Inside #225: Yemen PDR #52O

Inside #227: Aden #12O


#MI BL A 22

Issued: ??.?.19??

OLYMPICS GAMES 84

#227 Overprinted OLYMPICS GAMES


Yemen Kingdom (Royalist Yemen) Stamps

(Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen)

Flag of the Kingdom of Yemen

The Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen sometimes spelled Mutawakelite Kingdom of Yemen, also known as the Kingdom of Yemen or (retrospectively) as North Yemen, was a country from 1918 to 1962 in the northern part of what is now Yemen. Its capital was at Taiz.

File:LocationNorthYemen.png

Religious leaders of the Zaydi sect of Shi'ite Islam expelled forces of the Ottoman Empire from what is now northern Yemen by the middle of the 17th century but, within a century, the unity of Yemen was fractured due to the difficulty of governing Yemen's mountainous terrain. In 1849, the Ottoman Empire occupied the coastal Tihamah region and pressured the Zaydi imam to sign a treaty recognizing Ottoman suzerainty and that allowed for a small Ottoman force to be stationed in Sanaa. However, the Ottomans were slow to gain control over Yemen and never managed to totally eliminate resistance from local Zaydis. In 1913, shortly before World War I, the Ottoman Empire was forced to formally cede some power to highland Zaydis.

On 30 October 1918, following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, Imam Yahya Muhammad of the al-Qasimi dynasty declared northern Yemen an independent state. In 1926, Imam Yahya declared himself king of the Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen, becoming a temporal as well as a (Zaydi) spiritual leader, and won international recognition for the state.

In the 1920s Yahya had expanded Yemeni power to the north into southern Tihamah and southern 'Asir but collided with the rising influence of the Sa'udi king of Hejaz and Nejd, Abdul Aziz ibn Sa'ud. In the early 1930s, Sa'udi forces retook much of these gains before withdrawing from some of the area including the southern Tihamah city of Al Hudaydah. The present-day boundary with Saudi Arabia was established by the 20 May 1934 Treaty of Taif. Yahya's non-recognition of his kingdom's southern boundary with the British Aden Protectorate (later the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen) that had been negotiated by his Ottoman predecessors resulted in occasional clashes with the British.

Yemen became a founding member of the Arab League in 1945 and the United Nations on 30 September 1947.

Imam Yahya died during an unsuccessful coup attempt in 1948 and was succeeded by his son Ahmad bin Yahya. His reign was marked by growing repression, renewed friction with the United Kingdom over the British presence in the south that stood in the way of his aspirations for the creation of Greater Yemen. In March 1955, a coup by a group of officers and two of Ahmad's brothers briefly deposed the king but was quickly suppressed.

Imam Ahmad faced growing pressures to support the Arab nationalist objectives of Egyptian President Gamal Abdul Nasser and, in April 1956, he signed a mutual defense pact with Egypt. In 1958, Yemen joined the United Arab Republic (Egypt and Syria) in a loose confederation known as the United Arab States but it was dissolved in September 1961 and relations between the United Arab Republic (Egypt) and Yemen subsequently deteriorated.

Ahmad died in September 1962, and was succeeded by his son, the Crown Prince Muhammad al-Badr. However Muhammad al-Badr's reign was brief. Egyptian-trained military officers inspired by Nasser and led by the commander of the royal guard Abdullah as-Sallal deposed him the same year of his coronation, took control of Sanaa, and created the Yemen Arab Republic (YAR). Egypt assisted the YAR with troops and supplies to combat forces loyal to the Imamate, while Saudi Arabia and Jordan supported Badr's royalist forces opposing the newly formed republic sparking the North Yemen Civil War. Conflict continued periodically until 1967 when Egyptian troops were withdrawn. By 1968, following a final royalist siege of Sanaa, most of the opposing leaders reached a reconciliation; Saudi Arabia recognized the Republic in 1970.

The YAR united with the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen (South Yemen) on May 22, 1990 to form the Republic of Yemen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutawakkilite_Kingdom_of_Yemen


MI #190 Bl.26O

Issued: 10.4.1965

The New York World's Fair

Pope Paul VI World Peace Visit to the United Nations

Inside MI #190 Bl.26 (In Margin): Vatican #416O

Inside MI #190 Bl.26 (In Margin): Vatican #418O


Mi #575-84O

Issued: 0.0.1968

Honoring World Philately

Inside #Mi 580: Yemen Mi #497O

Inside #Mi 580: Yemen Mi #456O

Inside #Mi 584: Yemen #3O

Inside #Mi 584: Yemen Mi #433O


Mi #Bl 126-9O

Issued: 15.8.1968

Honoring World Philately

Inside #Mi Bl 126-9 (In Margin): Various Middle East Stamps To Be Identify


Mi #627-31O

Issued: 1.11.1968

EFIMEX

Olympic games s/sInside #Mi 627: Yemen Mi #B94O

Inside #Mi 628: Yemen Mi #523O

Inside #Mi 631: Yemen Mi #524O

Inside #Mi 629: Yemen Mi #521O

Inside #Mi 631: Yemen Mi #547O

Mi #632 Bl 144-145O

Issued: 25.12.1968


Image

Mi #1078BO

(plastic, 3D, part of 1073-8B)

Issued: ??.??.1970

PHILATOKYO 1971

Inside Mi #???: Japan #907O

Mi #BL 213BO (plastic, 3D)

Inside Mi #???: Japan #931O

Thanks to Lou Guadagno


Yemen Arab Republic (Y.A.R.) stamps

Flag of the Yemen Arab Republic

The Yemen Arab Republic (YAR) also known as North Yemen or Yemen (Sanaa), was a country from 1962 to 1990 in the northern part of what is now Yemen. Its capital was at Sanaa. Following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, northern Yemen became an independent state as the Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen. On 27 September 1962, revolutionaries inspired by the Arab nationalist ideology of United Arab Republic (Egyptian) President Gamal Abdul Nasser deposed the newly-crowned King Muhammad al-Badr, took control of Sanaa, and established the Yemen Arab Republic (YAR). This coup d'état marked the beginning of the North Yemen Civil War that pitted YAR troops assisted by the United Arab Republic (Egypt) while Saudi Arabia and Jordan supported Badr's royalist forces opposing the newly formed republic. Conflict continued periodically until 1967 when Egyptian troops were withdrawn. By 1968, following a final royalist siege of Sanaa, most of the opposing leaders reached a reconciliation; Saudi Arabia recognized the Republic in 1970.

File:LocationNorthYemen.png

Unlike East and West Germany or North and South Korea, the YAR and its southern neighbour, the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen (PDRY), also known as South Yemen, remained relatively friendly, though relations were often strained. In 1972 it was declared unification would eventually occur. However, these plans were put on hold in 1979, and war was only prevented by an Arab League intervention. The goal of unity was reaffirmed by the northern and southern heads of state during a summit meeting in Kuwait in March 1979. What the PDRY government failed to tell the YAR government was that it wished to be the dominant power in any unification, and left wing rebels in North Yemen began to receive extensive funding and arms from South Yemen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yemen_Arab_Republic


Mi #1109-16O

Issued: 8.5.1970

UPU New Headquarters

 

 

Germany #748-9

Germany #771-2

Inside #Mi 1109: Europa Design 1956-7 (B)

Germany #790-1

Germany #805-6

Inside #Mi 1110: Europa Design 1958-9 Type CD1 & CD2 (B)

Germany #818-20

Germany #844-5

Inside #Mi 1111: Europa Design 1960-1 Type CD3 & CD4 (B)

Germany #852-3

Germany #867-8

Inside #Mi 1112: Europa Design 1962-3 Type CD5 & CD6 (B)

Germany #897-8

Germany #934-5

Inside #Mi 1113: Europa Design 1964-5 Type CD7 & CD8 (B)

Germany #963-4

Germany #969-70

Inside #Mi 1114: Europa Design 1966-7 Type CD9 & CD10 (B)

Germany #983-4

Germany #996-7

Inside #Mi 1115: Europa Design 1968-9 Type CD11 & CD12 (B)

 

 

Inside #Mi 1116: Europa Design 1970 (B)

Thanks to Lou


Mi #Bl 126-7O (Thanks to Lou)

Issued: 8.5.1970

UPU New Headquarters

Inside #Mi Bl 126: Liechtenstein #356O

Inside #Mi Bl 126 (in margin): Germany #845O

Inside #Mi Bl 126 (in margin): Italy #943O

Inside #Mi Bl 126 (in margin): Luxembourg #467O

Inside #Mi Bl 127: Luxembourg #320O

Inside #Mi Bl 127 (in margin): Belgium #527O

Inside #Mi Bl 127 (in margin): Italy #1000O

Inside #Mi Bl 127 (in margin): Saar #286O


Mi #Bl 139-40O (Thanks to Lou)

Issued: 10.9.1970

Philympia '70

Inside #Mi Bl 139: Germany #B89O

Inside #Mi Bl 139 (in margin): G.B. #271P, #272O, #273O

Inside #Mi Bl 140: Mexico #C311O

Inside #Mi Bl 140 (in margin): Many Stamps To Be Identify


MK #878-83P

Issued: 10.9.1970

Philympia '70

Inside #MK 878: Greece #163O

Inside #MK 879: France #201O

Inside #MK 880: US #719O

Inside #MK 881: G.B. #274P

Inside #MK 882: Italy #807O

Inside #MK 883: Yemen #MK 551O


Scott: #395-400O

Issued: 15.9.1981

100th Anniversary of the death of Sir Rowland Hill (in 1979)

Inside #396: Yemen #159O

Inside #397: TBI (European stamps)

Inside #399: TBI

Inside #400: Yemen #322O

Scott: #401-2O

Thanks to Lloyd Gilbert for the scans


Yemen stamps

Flag of Yemen

No Stamps


Best website related:

Arab Gulf and Yemen Stamp Group

http://www.epmsite.com/

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