Hawaii stamps

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Hawai'i was an independent kingdom until 1893 and a republic until 1898, when annexed to the USA. From June 14 1900, only USA postage stamps were valid in the Territory of Hawai'i.

 

All new stamps in this page are of the record Issued by

HAWAI'I POST - pick up and deliver urgent mail.


Scott: #????O

Issued: 27.6.1951

Stamp Centenary Exhibition

Inside #????: Hawai'i #1O and with centre (value) inverted


Scott: #????O

Issued: 13.6.2000

Centenary of the last day of use of Hawaiian postage stamps

Inside #????: Hawai'i #76O

Inside #????: Hawai'i #77O

Inside #????: Hawai'i #78O

(#78 is the only Hawaiian postage stamp bearing the "Republic of Hawaii" name)

A set of 3 postage stamps, a mini-sheet and a booklet were issued on June 13 2000 to celebrate the Centenary of the last day of use of Hawai'i postage stamps on June 13 1900. From June 14 1900, only U.S. postage stamps were valid in the Territory of Hawai'i.

The mini-sheet shows a Hawai'i 4c postal envelope with a June 13 1900 cancel.

The mini-sheet shows a Hawai'i 4c postal envelope with a June 13 1900 cancel.

A First Day Cover was issued on June 13 2000 with a special cachet and postmark. The special cachet above shows an example of an actual duplex cancel used on the last day. All canceling devices after June 13 1900 were then destroyed and replaced by different ones.

The special postmark for the above cover was issued for June 13 2000 only. The outer circle reads "Centenary of the Last Day of Use of Hawai'i Postage Stamps." The inner circle reads " WAIKIKI, O'AHU, HAWAI'I POST". The center lines across read "1900/JUNE 13/2000."

A First Day Cover was also issued on June 13 2000 with a special cachet and postmark for the mini-sheet.


Scott: #????O

Issued: 1.10.2001

150th Anniversary of the First Postage Stamps of Hawai'i

Inside #????: Hawai'i #1O

Inside #????: Hawai'i #2O

Inside #????: Hawai'i #3O

Inside #????: Hawai'i #4O

 

On August 4th 1851, King Kamehameha III issued a royal decree authorizing the issuance of the first postage stamps of Hawai'i. The "Missionaries" (as they are known) were printed on a small printing press at the offices of the weekly government newspaper "The Polynesian" in Honolulu. On October 1st 1851, the first 3 stamps were released by Postmaster Henry M. Whitney at the Honolulu Post Office and by Postmaster Svend Hoffmeyer at the Lahaina, Maui Post Office (located inside the Lahaina Customs House on Front Street). Lahaina was the capital of Hawai'i until 1846. The fourth stamp was issued in April 1852. A surviving cover can be dated to April 23 1852.

The stamp designs were made of stock fonts and ornaments assembled into a "cliche". The stamps were printed on pelure paper which is very thin and brittle. The vast majority of the Missionaries that survive to-day are imperfect in some way (pieces missing, tears, holes, thins etc.). Even so, they are some of the rarest stamps in the world and are much sought after. The fourth stamp was issued in 1852 and is the same as the third stamp, but has a different heading ("H.I. & U.S. Postage" instead of "Hawaiian Postage") and was issued to clear up some confusion as the 13c rate also included a portion of U.S. postage, not just Hawaiian postage.

u                The 2c Missionary paid for newspapers to the U.S.A.

u                The 5c Missionary was for Hawaiian postage.

u                The 13c Missionary paid for letters to the East Coast of the U.S.A (5c Hawaiian postage, 2c Ship fee and 6c for U.S. postage).

u                Inter-island postage remained free until 1859.

An $8 mini-sheet shows the first Honolulu Post Office in 1851 (left) and has all 4 "Missionaries" on an $8 stamp with simulated perfs. Above the stamp is the title of the newspaper "The Polynesian" where the stamps were printed. The bottom text reads: "150th Anniversary of the First Hawai'i Postage Stamps. The "Missionaries" were printed at the offices of the weekly government newspaper "The Polynesian". The first 3 stamps were released by Postmaster Henry M. Whitney in Honolulu and Postmaster Svend Hoffmeyer in Lahaina, Maui on October 1st 1851."

The First Day Covers were postmarked in Honolulu (brown ink) and Lahaina (blue ink). The Lahaina First Day Ceremony was publicized in the "Maui News" newspaper of October 1st.

To learn more about the "Missionaries" visit: http://www.hawaiianstamps.com/missionary.html


Scott: #????O

Issued: 15.12.2004

King Kamehameha III, 150th Anniversary of his death

Inside #????: Hawai'i #5O

Inside #????: Hawai'i #6O

To learn more about the " Boston Engraved" visit:

http://www.hawaiianstamps.com/boston_engraved.html

Kalani Kauikeaouli was born on August 11 1813, the son of King Kamehameha the Great and his highest ranking wife Keopuolani. King Kamehameha II died of measles in England on July 14 1825 while waiting to be seen by King George of England. The Hawaiian Chiefs met on June 6 1825 and chose Kalani Kauikeaouli to be the next King of Hawai'i, naming him King Kamehameha III. As he was only 11 years old at the time, Ka'ahumanu (one of King Kamehameha the Great's wives) was appointed as Regent. She was a very religious person, but the King rebelled against her strict upbringing by drinking, gambling and having female company.

When Ka'ahumanu died in 1832, the King at the age of 18 attempted to rule the Kingdom by himself, but the Chiefs appointed another Regent Kina'u, also a staunch Christian. The King continued his worldly pursuits. But upon the death of his sister in 1836, he changed his ways and gave up drinking.

In 1837, at the age of 24, King Kamehameha III married Kalama. Although not of high rank, the King thought Kalama would provide new blood and an heir. In 1840, he drew up a new Constitution. In 1843, the Hawaiian Islands came under British Sovereignty for about 5 months. But the Hawaiian flag was soon to fly again over the islands. In November of the same year, Britain and France recognized the independence of Hawai'i.

Under the "Great Mahele" of 1850, native Hawaiians were given fee-simple land by the King. This act was the death of the old feudal land system, whereby all the lands were owned by the King. On August 4th 1851, King Kamehameha III issued a royal decree authorizing the issuance of the first postage stamps of Hawai'i known as the "Missionaries".

In 1853, the King became ill and, without children and fearing the worst, he adopted Alexander Liholiho as his son and proclaimed him his successor. King Kamehameha III died on December 15 1854. His State Funeral was held on January 10 1855. The next day, Alexander Liholiho became King Kamehameha IV of Hawai'i.


label produced by Hawaiian Philatelic Society


Best websites related:

HAWAI'I POST

http://www.hawaii-post.com/

Welcome to POST OFFICE IN PARADISE

http://www.hawaiianstamps.com/

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