Gibraltar stamps

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Flag of Gibraltar


#125

Scott: #125O (CD308)

Issued: 10.10.1949

UPU Issue

Inside #125: Stamps on Envelopes


#238-9

Scott: #238-9P

Issued: 18.9.1970

Philympia '70

European fishing championship 3v Inside #238: Gibraltar #178aO

Thanks to Jan Van Lin for the scan

#30a Inside #239: Gibraltar #30aO

http://www.sandafayre.com/gallery/country_165_1.htm


#273#274#275

Scott: #273-5O

Issued: 15.2.1971

Coil Definitive

#10 Inside #273-5: Gibraltar Type A7, 1886 (B) (Pic of #10)

#275a

Scott: #275aO


#356-8

Scott: #356-8P

Issued: 27.5.1977

Amphilex '77 Int'l. Philatelic Exhibition

#182 Inside #356: Gibraltar #182O

#233 Inside #357: Gibraltar #233O

#294 Inside #358: Gibraltar #294O


#378-81

Scott: #378-9P, #380-1O

Issued: 7.2.1979

Death Centenary of Sir Rowland Hill

#10 Inside #378: Gibraltar #10O

#274 Inside #379: Gibraltar #274O

Inside #381: None-Cancellation


#459-60

Scott: #459-60P

Issued: 6.3.1984

Europa 1984

#98 Inside #459: Gibraltar #98O


#485-7#488

#489

Scott: #485-9O

Issued: 25.3.1986

Centenary, Gibraltar Postage Stamps

#18 Inside #485: Gibraltar #18O

#42 Inside #486: Gibraltar #42O

#67 Inside #487: Gibraltar #67O

#118 Inside #488: Gibraltar #118O

#131 Inside #489: Gibraltar #131O

#490

Scott: #490O

 Inside #490: Gibraltar #2O

Thanks to Zhang Kanghua for the scan


#570#571#572

Scott: #570-2O

Issued: 3.5.1990

150th Anniversary, Penny Black

#1 LJ Inside #570-2: G.B. #1 [L-B]

#573

Scott: #573O

Visit: The Penny Black Plate project http://www.arcieriminerva.it/SOS/homeSOS.htm


#779-93

#793

Scott: #779-93O

Issued: 4.3.1999

Scott: #885-6P

Thanks to Lloyd Gilbert for the scans

Issued: 01.06.2001

Definitive

#299 Inside #779-93, 885-6:

Similar to G. B. Type A129 (B) (Pic of G. B. #299)


Scott: #860-3O

Thanks to Lloyd Gilbert for the scans

Issued: 22.1.2001

Death Centenary, Queen Victoria

#13 1855 perf 14 Inside #860 (On label): G.B. #13

ID Correction: Thanks to Lou Guadagno

Lou wrote: It is not G.B. #2 - the stamp has the two white lines added and is perforated,

So it is #13 (perf 14, 1855) - see scan, you can see  the perfs in the label and scan match.

#1 LJ Inside #863 (On label): G.B. #1


#1026

Scott: #1026P

Issued: 30.9.2005

50 Years of Europa Stamps

#384 Inside #1026: Gibraltar #384O


2007

Scott: #1084-7P

Issued: 26.09.2007

Gibraltar Postal Anniversaries

Scan not available Inside #1084: G.B. Morocco Agencies #35O

#27 Inside #1086-7: G.B. #27O

#28  Inside #1086: G.B. #28O

Thanks to Lou Guadagno

The Gibraltar Post Office was created on 1st January 1857, when the Packet Agency and Overland Post Office were amalgamated under the control of the Postmaster General of Great Britain and Ireland. This year therefore marks the 150th anniversary of this event. At the time of the creation of the Gibraltar Post Office, the Packet Agency had premises at Turnbull's Lane. The Overland Post Office operated from the office of the Colonial Secretary in Secretary's Lane. Edmund Creswell (Postmaster, 1831), secured funding from London for building a new post office for Gibraltar.
Work on the building commenced straight away. It was inaugurated on 1st September 1858. This is the Post Office that is still in use today, at 104 Main Street. It is a daily reminder to us of the events of 150 years ago, when the Gibraltar Post Office was created.
The anniversaries are depicted by the following stamps:
On 1 January 1907, the Gibraltar Post Office ceased to have responsibility for the British postal service in Morocco, but Gibraltar stamps and postal stationery remained valid until 28 February 1907. This postcard from Fez was used on the last day of its validity.
On 1 January 1857, the Gibraltar Post Office was created through the amalgamation of the maritime Packet Agency and the Overland Post Office, to handle all Gibraltar's mail. The P.O. initially used the last Gibraltar datestamp of the Packet Agency, shown here.
On 3 September 1857, British postage stamps were first placed on sale at the Gibraltar Post Office, to prepay letters. They were cancelled with a distinctive obliterator consisting of the letter "G" in a barred oval.
On 1 April 1857, the first British Postal Agency in Morocco was established in Tangier, and placed under Gibraltar's control. The envelope shown is the earliest known letter from Morocco handled by the British Postal Agency and sent via Gibraltar.


2010

Scott: #1229-32P

Issued: 26.03.2010

King George V Anniversary

Inside #1230: Stamps Collecting

Thanks to Dr. Eli Moallem


125th Ann of Gib Stamps

Scott: #1278-82P

Issued: 15.04.2011

125th Anniversary of Gibraltar Stamps

 Inside #1278: Gibraltar #7O

 Inside #1279: Gibraltar #48O

 Inside #1280: Gibraltar #74O

 Inside #1281: Gibraltar #118O

 Inside #1282: Gibraltar #131O

Thanks to Prof. Plinio Richelmi and to Lou Guadagno

Early details of postal arrangements in Gibraltar are hard to establish although it is known that postal facilities were provided by the Civil Secretary’s Office from 1749. Gibraltar became a packet port in July 1806 (a year after the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805), although the Civil Secretary’s office continued to be responsible for other mail. The two services were amalgamated on 1st January 1857 as a Branch Office of the British Post Office with the control of the Gibraltar Post Office not reverting to Gibraltar until the 1st January 1886.

Spanish stamps could be used in Gibraltar from their introduction in 1850 and indeed such franking was required on letters weighing over ½ oz. sent to Spain after 1 July 1854. From 1 July 1856 until 1 January 1876 all mail to Spain required postage to be prepaid by Spanish stamps and there issues were supplied by the Gibraltar Postal Authority acting as a Spanish Postal Agent. The mail forwarded under this system was cancelled at San Roque with a horizontal barred oval, later replaced with by a cartwheel postmark showing numeral 63. From 1857 combination envelopes showing the 2d ship mail fee paid in British stamps and the inland postage by Spanish issues exist.

Stamps of Great Britain were issued for use in Gibraltar from 3 September 1857 to the end of 1885. The initial supply contained 1d, 4d and 6d values.

Finally on the 1st January 1886 the Colonial Government of Gibraltar assumed control of its Postal Services. As an interim measure, Bermuda stamp plates were overprinted with ‘Gibraltar’ using different colours. These were replaced by Gibraltar’s own design in December of that same year.

Gibraltar’s stamps were used with peseta values from 1889 to 1898 since trade was carried out in this currency. Stamp designs were rather stereotyped until 1931 when, at the Governor’s request, Captain Garrood, Gibraltar’s Crown Surveyor and Engineer, produced the first pictorial Definitive.

The first commemorative issue was in 1935. The release of such issues were confined up to 1966 to Crown Agents ‘Omnibus’ issues and marked events of international interest. From 1966 subjects of a predominantly local flavour were chosen as well as international events.

Today Gibraltar continues to adopt a conservative stamp issuing policy thus maintaining its high reputation amongst the philatelic fraternity. Gibraltar stamps are highly collected worldwide and the Gibraltar Philatelic Bureau proudly despatched its stamps to collectors worldwide.

The 125th Anniversary of Gibraltar stamps feature iconic stamps issued during five reigns: the 1886 Queen Victoria Bermuda overprint one shilling; the 1903 King Edward VII one pound; the 1926 King George V five pounds; the 1938 King George VI one pound and the 1953 Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II half shilling. These and the complete archive of Gibraltar stamps issued over the past 125 years are included in the The ‘Historic Stamps’ section of www.gibraltar-stamps.com

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Thanks to Lou Guadagno for the scans


60 Years of the first Gibraltar Queen Elizabeth II

Scott: #????-?O

Issued: 18.07.2013

60 Years of the first Gibraltar Queen Elizabeth II

Inside #????-? (B):

1953 Views of Gibraltar 14v

Gibraltar #132-45

 

"I declare before you all that my whole life, whether it be long or short, shall be devoted to your service and the service of our great imperial family to which we all belong”

The first definitive stamps of Queen Elizabeth II were placed on sale on 19th October 1953. The colony’s first ever philatelic exhibition was held to coincide with the first day of issue. A special postmark was used at the exhibition held at the Calpe Institute which was run by the British Council.

The 1953 series was prepared using King George VI head depicting the St. Edward’s Crown over the portrait’s oval and was meant to replace the old definitive set of King George VI. On account of King George’s VI death on the 6th February 1952, the same designs were used with the Queen Elizabeth II head as a substitution. The pictorial set of fourteen values was designed by Mr Norman Cumming, a Government draughtsman.

The Queen’s Accession: King George VI died in his sleep at Sandringham House on the night of 6 February 1952. He was aged just 56. Long illness and the strain of leadership during the dark days of World War II had taken their toll on the much-loved monarch. Princess Elizabeth, the elder of the king’s two daughters, was away in Kenya at the beginning of a royal tour of Commonwealth states, standing in for her father because of his ill health. The news of his death was broken to her by her husband Prince Philip. Elizabeth, aged just 25, faced not only the grief of losing her father, but the daunting prospect that she was now Queen of the United Kingdom and Head of the Commonwealth. Although Elizabeth had acceded to the throne, it would be another 16 months until her coronation.

The Coronation: Queen Elizabeth’s arrival at Westminster Abbey, where 8,000 guests awaited, marked the beginning of the religious ceremony that would conclude with her coronation. She was dressed in white silk embroidered with the emblems of the Commonwealth nations and on top of it, the velvet Robe of State, more than 5 metres long, its train supported by seven maids of honour. At the altar, the Queen took the Coronation Oath, swearing to uphold justice and the laws of her realms and to defend the Anglican faith. Then, in the most ancient and sacred moment of the ceremony, the Queen was anointed with holy oil by the Archbishop of Canterbury whilst seated in the Coronation Chair. As she received royal sceptres, orb and robe, and finally the crown itself, the congregation responded with a shout of ‘God save the Queen!’

http://www.gibraltar-stamps.com/index.php?controller=stamps&action=stampdetails&id=1291#technicalSpecs

Martin Hirschbühl

Thanks to Martin Hirschbühl


Scott: #????O

Issued: 24.04.2015

Definitive 2015 (175th Anniversary of The Penny Black)

GB #1 Inside #????: G.B. #1 (B)

Thanks to Prof. Plinio Richelmi


http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-cjCbR0BAX3Y/VTYhgDzeXeI/AAAAAAAAN7c/FuU5dVfvozM/s1600/gibraltar_20150400_01.jpg

Scott: #????O

Issued: 24.04.2015

175th Anniversary of The Penny Black

GB #1 Inside #????: G.B. #1 [F-K]

Thanks to Prof. Plinio Richelmi


Best website related:

The Gibraltar Philatelic Bureau

http://www.gibraltar-stamps.com

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